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Trivializing the Holocaust?

An unwritten law exists against certain things.
During World War 2, Adolf Hitler presided over the design of Nazi weapons of mass destruction. Although he never deployed them, he was as committed to their development as he was to the prosecution of the Holocaust.

The references to Hitler during the 2016 American election were reprehensible.Black and white photograph of V-2 missile taking off. Nazi Weapons of Mass Destruction

To equate the behavior of an American presidential candidate with that of Adolf Hitler just serves to trivialize the horrific deaths of millions of people, especially the incredibly heinous killing of children.

Nazi Weapons of Mass Destruction

It strongly reminded me of the Middle Eastern states that connived to use Nazi weapons of mass destruction against the new state of Israel.

Certain Middle Eastern states gave a warm welcome, after World War 2, to a number of the Nazi military and security high command and to weapons’ scientists and technicians.

With plans to use rocket technology and biological warfare against the Jewish state, it was a serious threat with which survivors of the Holocaust had to cope.Black and white photograph of V1 missile being pulled along on a trolley by several air force men. Nazi Weapons of Mass Destruction.

How could they have prepared themselves for such extremely repugnant behavior – their enemies joining with the killers of children to try and kill more?

Yet, now being able, no matter how basically, to attempt a defense, they did so with great resolve.

Hardened Killers Thwarted

In the end, the technologically advanced and militarily proficient Nazis could not produce the desired results with their willing but less advanced allies.

Israel successfully thwarted planned missile attacks and the spreading of toxic chemicals and microbes among the small Israeli population.

With ‘Operation Damocles’, Israel was able to clandestinely assassinate a number of the German specialists, which was a strong deterrent to any others who may have been tempted.

Thus, the Jewish state avoided the threat of Nazi weapons of mass destruction .

An Ironic Aerial Deliverance

Strangely, ex-Nazi weapons did play an important role in the early struggles of the Jewish state, but in a positive sense.

License-built Nazi Messerschmitt 109 aircraft from Czechoslovakia were the only fighter planes Israel were able to acquire.Black and white photograph of Israeli Air Force Avia S-199 Messerschnitt with an open hatch and star insignia. Nazi Weapons of Mass Destruction. Fitted with an inferior motor to the original, they were far inferior to the British-made Spitfire with the renowned Merlin engine.

Yet armed with the most important factor, pilots dedicated enough to give their lives to save the Jewish state, they were successful.

Their intervention on a fateful day stopped an Egyptian force headed for Tel Aviv and chased Egyptian Spitfires from the skies above.

However, the belligerent nations were able to acquire some ex-Nazi weapons.

Were they even more desirable to Israel’s enemies because of the historical regime they represented?Colored photograph of Israeli Air Force Hatzerim Avia Messerchmitt. Nazi Weapons of Mass Destruction.

Such ironies were not lost on veterans like Ariel Sharon, who said, much later, We’ve got more tanks now than the Germans!

Certainly war is replete with ironies and the triumph of Israeli-owned, ex-Nazi Messerschmitts was the irony of ironies.
 
 

Complimentary Prequel Coming Soon

Experience a dramatic event in the career of Israeli general, Tuvia Alon, in my soon to be released complimentary prequel to political thriller novel, Eleventh Hour Covenant, Ambushed by History

Image Credits
1.Black and White photograph of V-1 missile on trolley
Bundesarchiv, Bild 146-1975-117-26 / Lysiak / CC-BY-SA 3.0 [CC BY-SA 3.0 de (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/de/deed.en)], via Wikimedia Commons

2.Colored photograph of Avia Messerschmitt
By Oren Rozen (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons

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